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Thread: Dry weight

  1. #1

    Dry weight

    What are most turn key chassis coming in at for weight with no driver no lead. Looking at mixing a few classes at a local track and looking for options for different engine sizes as far as handicapping

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Central Ohio
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    304

    Re: Dry weight

    The following is about asphalt racing and the post doesn't say if they are dirt or pavement. I'm sharing an account of what happened to us as we tried to make the track people happy while trying to achieve parity within our club.

    I'm not 100% sure what you want to do but I have an opinion on dwarf car racing in general that might be food for thought. Many of you know the OVDCA, that's the asphalt racing dwarf cars in Ohio has disbanded. The car count had diminished since the hay days of past and in our area we were fortunate enough to have 3 asphalt short tracks. One closed. the other sported the Legends 3-5 times a year and was affiliated with them, the last was the long-standing home track for the OVDCA. New ownership was forcing the dwarf car club to jump thru many tight hoops to meet the criteria they wanted. Each year the club raced weekly being threatened that the class would be cancelled. As other classes were dwindling in numbers, the dwarf cars were slowly increasing. Along with that came an increase of changes to the car to include the 1000cc fuel-injected motors. American Racer tires were required and the next thing we saw were cars challenging the speed records at the track almost weekly. It also brought on some horrific wrecks. The class was threatened now to slow the cars down as it had twice as many calls for ambulance rides and use of care flight than any of the other classes. While many of these same drivers took the ride and later cleared to be okay, we understood it was a drain on the services and insurance was going to be an overall track issue.

    Looking back, I wonder what could have been done differently. We were trying to stay in step with Michigan so the cars could easily intermingle on any given weekend. The use of a roof wing was in the developing stages that appeared to do just that. It slowed the cars a half second across the board and gave the cars some down force stability. 4 bolts would remove it in only a few minutes and no reason to change anything else. The wing was to be offered to the class by the acting board members for $40 and they monitored the installation to insure parity. The track manager was impressed enough he declared they be used on all dwarf cars and if out of town cars came to race there they be required to mount a wing. We were making enough to have extra for any visitors as the mounting would only take minutes to use 2 existing holes and drill 2 more. For whatever the reason, 2 club members fought their use. Details are sketchy but the final result was the disbanding of the club. The track mamager has no plans to ever run them again.

    One of the thoughts was to change engines. While some claim they could reach the same speeds with half the motor, I now believe that course of action might have saved the OVDCA. In an effort to save the local members money, perhaps we should have shunned the Michigan club occasional mingling and done our own thing. 600cc motors are easy to find at less cost than the popular 1000cc motors everyone wants today. I know I'm reaching for straws but when faced weekly with extinction and orders to slow the cars, perhaps we should have considered a complete remake of the class.

    The rest of you are lucky. You have members that are loyal and tracks that are willing to promote this wonderful and very affordable class---------------------------or do you.

    My point to the original post is this: weight was considered by our club and pointed out that the amount of weight needed to actually make a difference would make the chassis unsafe. I believe if I were trying to start a new club that would run at a local track regularly I would consider changing to a smaller engine with less horsepower. Target a track lap time that you believe would be acceptable to the track, club members, and put on a good show. Maybe where you are the cars are already there and it's not a concern. I want to see a come back of the dwarf cars and in today's economy they are without a doubt the most affordable true race car that can put on a great show. Unfortunately with the number of asphalt tracks closing their doors, we may need to jump thru their hoops to get our laps in. Also; clubs may need to sanction members. 2 bitter members parked 12 cars and to date only 2 are known to be running with the same owners.

    Handicaping a few never seems to be the answer. I believe parity is the true answer but at an amature level impossible to enforce. Slowing them all to a competitive level and letting the drivers go thru the learning curve may work but some will always cheat. Get proactive to limit the power source (powerplants) by slashing across the entire class.

  3. #3

    Re: Dry weight

    that's kind of what I'm looking at how close to 850 with driver could you get one. we have a mini mod class here locally that runs 600's so would like to see how close we could get or how much I'd have to add to be somewhat close on a 6th mile track just running as a test/tune go have fun no purse trophy top three class to get some old cars drug out of the barns and used again

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Central Ohio
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    304

    Re: Dry weight

    Quote Originally Posted by racer17j View Post
    that's kind of what I'm looking at how close to 850 with driver could you get one. we have a mini mod class here locally that runs 600's so would like to see how close we could get or how much I'd have to add to be somewhat close on a 6th mile track just running as a test/tune go have fun no purse trophy top three class to get some old cars drug out of the barns and used again
    I cannot speak for a mini mod type car. The TUSA (spelling) rules does not allow chromalloy to be used in any of the construction of dwarf car chassis for a variety of reasons. That's where a lot of guys can save weight over others, then redistribute the weight to the critical areas to get a "balance" of the car. The pipe diameter is almost exactly the same but the strength of the metal is greater so they can use a thinner walled tubing. That's why the rules allow a weep hole to be drilled by tech inspectors so they can measure the wall thickness of the tube. Most dwarf cars with engines, steel wheels, and fuel cell will be in the 1000-1050 lb. range as perscribed by the rules. Very difficult to get it much lighter legally. Our club had a 1250 lb with driver minimum and many ran the cars at or about 1300 to achieve a left side maximum percentage dictated in the rules. Mods' answer to a different set of rules. If you have them at 850 with driver now, I don't know how you can do much more and have a safe car?

  5. #5

    Re: Dry weight

    they are a whole different animal, they save a lot of weight on just tires, wheels. They also have a chain drive and rear axle like a micro so no heavy housing and gear,no driveshaft, no front brakes, no independent front suspension parts, lighter spindles ,no steering rack, smaller cabin area, and main frame is also 1 1/4 I think so all that could easily be a couple hundy #s so that brings up the point of how safe they would be on the track with other cars that weight 500# more if we ran dwarfs @1300 with the 1100's. I have seen them run together at one track but there was only 1 so it's hard to say. I really like those batwing cars and might build one if they catch on here but right now there just isn't anywhere to run them with more then 3-4 other cars unless you want to travel to bfe every weekend.

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